News Roundup

By on June 26, 2009

newsroundup13Each week we’ll round up the latest N.C. agricultural headlines from newspapers across the state and country, as well as excerpts from the stories. Click on the links to go straight to each paper’s full story.

  • “To save farms, you must save the farmers,” Charlotte Observer: Three trends are on a collision course: A rapidly growing regional interest in and market for, locally grown foods: vegetables and fruits, meats and even dairy products. Rapid disappearance of farmland in the fast-sprawling Charlotte region. An aging farming community. …
  • “NC warns farmers about high levels of wheat toxin,” Durham Herald-Sun: North Carolina agriculture leaders urged farmers Monday to have their wheat tested after officials found high levels of a toxin in wheat samples from parts of the state. Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler said vomitoxin has been found in samples from central and northeastern North Carolina. The toxin is a byproduct of a fungus often caused by wet weather during the early April pollination stage. …
  • “Farmland is important in Buncombe County–even if we don’t live on a farm,” Asheville Citizen-Times: According to the latest Census of Agriculture, farm acreage decreased 24% in Buncombe County between 2002-2007. This rate is much faster than the 9% loss of farmland acreage that occurred between the previous 15 year period (1987-2002). This loss of farmland is not only changing our landscapes, but also changing the quality of life of county residents. …
  • “Blueberries are in season,” Fayetteville Observer: Blueberries could very well be called “the other summer fruit.” The humble blueberry often comes in second to the decadent strawberry when summer breezes in, but the tiny blue fruit’s flavor wows our taste buds just the same.There’s no other time when blueberries are juicer and tastier than when they are in season. And guess what? The time is now. …
  • “Harvesting new markets,” Smoky Mountain News: Across Western North Carolina, an increasing number of people are discovering new and creative ways to use the bounty of produce and farm goods raised in the mountains. From jams to sauces to salves, homegrown chefs and artisans are turning a profit with their creations, which are known as value-added products. …
  • “A Whole Lotta Happy,” indieNC blog: I have to admit, I have a not so secret love affair with the N.C. State Fair. Usually I can contain my excitement till about September when it is time to start planning and preparing for the N.C. State Fair baking competitions. But recently I had a reason to get excited early when the N.C. State Fair released the 2009 theme and design “A Whole Lotta Happy,” and it made me a whole lotta happy! …
  • “Farmers markets on the increase,” Hendersonville Times-News: Mountain residents are demanding locally grown food. In response, two farmers markets have opened in Henderson County within the last year and another is scheduled to open next month. :Henderson County is not just apples,” Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project Program Director Peter Marks told members of the Henderson County Agriculture Advisory Board Wednesday. Over the last several decades, Western North Carolina has lost hundreds of farms, and the state has one of the fastest rates of farm loss in the country. Markets are one way for farms to remain viable. …
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