News Roundup: July 31-August 6

By on August 6, 2010

News Roundup logoEach week we round up the latest N.C. agricultural headlines from news outlets across the state and country, as well as excerpts from the stories. Click on the links to go straight to the full story.

  • Grants will boost local agriculture: Applications accepted through Nov. 22,” Mountain Xpress: WNC Agricultural Options is introducing a new community grants program that will support projects that are improving the local agricultural system. WNC AgOptions will fund at least three farmer-led group projects that address processing, marketing, packaging and other distribution needs in the mountain region. …
  • Local farmers get tool-lending library,” News & Observer: The Rural Advancement Foundation International-USA granted a $30,000 grant to 10 Triangle farmers to set up a sustainable agriculture tool-lending library. …
  • For some in North Carolina, goodness grows at home,” WRAL-TV: In shallow trays of organic soil at her greenhouse in Harrisburg, onetime real estate agent Kate Brun is cultivating a business: growing and selling microgreens, tiny herbs and vegetables harvested when their first leaves appear. …
  • New children’s tour links farm to table,” Lexington Dispatch: Michelle Patterson said she has heard children say some of the darndest things while touring her family’s farm in southwestern Rowan County. But one statement really got to her. She asked a group of young children what a cow says, and a 4-year-old, who was not trying to make a joke, earnestly replied, “Eat more chicken.” …
  • Wilkes has over 3,000 acres in ag districts,” Wilkes Journal-Patriot: A little over 3,000 acres have been approved for inclusion in a program designed to help preserve farmland and timberland in Wilkes County. …
  • Study claims conventional ag limits greenhouse gas,” Charlotte Observer: Advances in conventional agriculture have dramatically slowed the flow of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, in part by allowing farmers to grow more food to meet world demand without plowing up vast tracts of land, a study by three Stanford University researchers has found. …
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