Emerald ash borer trapping: No new counties detected

By on September 24, 2014

An emerald ash borer trap hangs in an ash tree in the Duke Forest.  Image: K. Oten, NCFS.

An emerald ash borer trap hangs in an ash tree in the Duke Forest. Image: K. Oten, NCFS.

As we head into the fall season full of football, autumn colors and Thanksgiving, we already have one thing to be thankful for:  summer trapping for the emerald ash borer did not detect the invasive, tree-killing beetle in any new counties in the state.

But don’t get too excited just yet. Although 2014 trapping did not detect any inter-county movement, the emerald ash borer was found at more sites within already-infested counties. And the beetle will likely continue to spread.

The emerald ash borer is responsible for killing countless ash trees in the United States. Native to Asia, the beetle was first found in the U.S. near Detroit in 2002. Since then, it has spread to 24 states.

In 2013, the emerald ash borer was first found in North Carolina in Granville, Person, Warren and Vance counties. All four of these counties remain under quarantine, meaning ash material and hardwood firewood cannot be transported from a quarantined area to a non-quarantined area (some exceptions are made; for example, wood that has been heat treated or had the bark removed may be moved with a compliance agreement from the Plant Industry Division). While the emerald ash borer can fly from tree to tree over short distances, it can easily spread over long distances through the transportation of infested material (hence the recommendation not to move firewood). The quarantine was established to best protect the remaining ash resources in the state from  long-range, human-facilitated movement.

Looking for the emerald ash borer is a job that never ends. The NCDA&CS Plant Industry Division and the N.C. Forest Service actively conduct visual surveys across the state. In addition, detection may depend on casual observations and the ability of citizens to identify and report an infestation. Survey techniques are continually evolving (such as using decoys to lure in and electrocute the male emerald ash borer!).

To report emerald ash borer in North Carolina, call 1-900-206-9333 or email newpest@ncagr.gov.

An adult emerald ash borer (Granville County). Image: NCFS.

An adult emerald ash borer (Granville County). Image: NCFS.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email