News Roundup: March 19-24

By on March 25, 2016

News Roundup - this week's top news stories about NC agriculture

Each week we round up the latest N.C. agricultural headlines from news outlets across the state and country, as well as excerpts from the stories.

  • “Richmond County farmers, firemen train for ag trauma,” Richmond County Daily Journal: Farming can be a dangerous job. It’s often listed as one of the top 10 deadliest professions — more hazardous than law enforcement and firefighting. The N.C. Cooperative Extension office in Rockingham hosted training Thursday for farmers and the firefighters who may be called to assist in a rescue. LaMar Grafft, associate director of the N.C. Agromedicine Institute in Greenville, led two programs during the day, each tailored to the separate groups of attendees. Grafft grew up on a farm in Iowa and was a farmer himself until 1986 and has worked in farm safety and as a paramedic. The institute is a consortium of East Carolina University, N.C. State University and N.C. Agricultural and Technical University and the program is funded by the N.C. Tobacco Trust Commission. …
  • “NC Farm Bureau Makes Significant Contribution to NCSU Plant Sciences Initiative,” Southern Farm Network: (Audio) Things really changed for NC State’s College of Ag and LIfe Sciences on Thursday with the half-million dollar donation from North Carolina Farm Bureau towards the Plant Sciences Initiative. Chancellor Randy Woodson with SFN’s Rhonda Garrison: “It’s a huge day. It’s a big day for North Carolina agriculture, certainly it’s a big day for NC State, and as I said to the dean this morning, ‘the passage of this bond just sends a signal to the state and the rest of the world North Carolina is serious about being the leader in production agriculture. And NC State is serious about being a leader in agricultural science.” …
  • “NC A&T Celebrates 30th Annual Small Farms Week,”  WFMY: (Video)  Whether you’re eating breakfast, getting dressed or putting gas in your car, agriculture plays a role! NC A&T is celebrating this key industry that generates nearly $80 billion for North Carolina’s economy yearly. It’s time for the 30th Annual Small Farms Week. Small Farms Week will be celebrated March 20-26. It includes workshops, tours, farming demonstrations and other events. This year has a special focus: to battle food insecurity. Approximately 30 counties statewide are participating in food drives in honor of Small Farms Week. Local County Cooperative Extension Centers are collecting food to help feed the hungry. All donated food will be used in the respective counties to stock food pantries. If you are interested in donating, contact your County Extension Center. …
  • “Awareness Week honors farmworkers’ contribution,” NCSU Technician: The Student Action for Farmworkers will initiate the 17th annual National Farmworkers Awareness Week Thursday. Involving campuses, communities and organizations, the week is organized to commemorate the contributions of farmworkers and raise awareness of farmworker challenges.  …
  • “Brownlee: Paying tribute to small farmers,” Robesonian: Agriculture is the leading industry in Robeson County. When farming is mentioned, many residents think of large-scale hog or poultry farms. But the National Agricultural Statistics Service’s 2012 Census of Agriculture shows that small-scale farms make up 88 percent of all farms nationwide and 87 percent in North Carolina. Many of these farms consist of small-scale agriculture, including fruit and vegetable production; small-scale livestock such as goats, pork and poultry; forestry production; and aquaculture. There are approximately 43,000 small-scale farmers statewide. To recognize their accomplishments, pioneering work and technological advancements, the state created North Carolina Small Farms Week. The theme for the 30th annual celebration, which begins today, is “Our Pride — Our Future: North Carolina Small Farmers.” …
  • “2 Charlotte beer makers are brewing for a fight over ‘Craft Freedom,’ Charlotte Observer: If you’re a fan of North Carolina’s rapidly growing craft beer world, get used to this phrase: “Craft freedom.” Two brewers in Charlotte, John Marrino of Olde Mecklenburg Brewery and Todd Ford of NoDa Brewing Co., have joined other small to mid-size breweries across the state to launch Craftfreedom.org, a campaign to push for changes in state rules that require breweries to sign with an outside distributor when they reach 25,000 barrels a year. …
  • “Gas from swine, poultry waste will power 4 Duke plants,” The News & Observer: Duke Energy has signed an agreement with Carbon Cycle Energy to buy methane gas produced from swine and poultry waste and use it to generate electricity at four of its natural gas plants in North Carolina. Duke filed with the North Carolina Utilities Commission to register the L.V. Sutton Combined Cycle Station in New Hanover County, the H.F. Lee station in Wayne County, the Dan River station in Rockingham County and the Buck station in Rowan County as new renewable energy facilities. Those facilities are expected to help Duke comply with the state renewable energy and energy efficiency standards, according to statements released Sunday. …
  • “Feed mill continues to serve farmers after 60 years, adapting to wants, needs,” Stanly News & Press: Since 1956, Mauney Feed Mill, first opened by James Mauney, has served the farming and gardening community of Stanly County and beyond. Kelly Vick, owner, started working for the company in 1990, bagging feed and sweeping floors. In 2001, he became Mauney’s business partner. He then bought the business in 2005. “I didn’t dare change the name,” Vick said. “Mauney Feed Mill has been a staple in the community for years. We’re a full service feed mill, manufacturing feed every day. The grain is all local from farmers in Stanly County.” Mauney’s is an independent Southern States dealer. “We are a full service lawn and garden center selling grass, seed and fertilizer,” Vick said. …
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