News Roundup: Dec. 30 – Jan. 5

By on January 5, 2018

News Roundup - this week's top news stories about NC agriculture

Each week we round up the latest N.C. agricultural headlines from news outlets across the state and country, as well as excerpts from the stories.

  • “Impressive agenda set for Southern Farm Show Jan. 31 – Feb. 2,” Southeast Farm Press: The Southern Farm Show, the largest agricultural exposition in the Carolinas and Virginia, is set for Jan. 31 through Feb. 2 at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh. The Southern Farm Show, the largest agricultural exposition in the Carolinas and Virginia, is set for Jan. 31 through Feb. 2 at the North Carolina State Fairgrounds in Raleigh.
    This marks the 41st Southern Farm Show to be held in Raleigh. Show manager David Zimmerman says much has changed in farming in the past 40 years, but what hasn’t changed is the need for farmers to have a venue where they can see the latest farm supplies, equipment and learn more about producing abundant fuel, food and fiber. …
  • “Education center to teach public about NC State dairy farms,” NCSU Technician: NC State will begin building its Dairy and Food Education Center that aims to educate visitors about the processes involved in turning the university’s dairy farm milk into Howling Cow products. The education center, which will be located off of Lake Wheeler Road, plans to open within the next two years. It is currently still in design, but is intended to be a new source of agritourism for Raleigh. Visitors will be able to learn how Howling Cow milk and ice cream are processed, created and packaged. They will also be educated on how NC State’s 400 cows are milked and taken care of and the work the dairy farmers do daily. A big goal of the center is to inform the public on where their food comes from. While designs are still being finalized, the public will likely be able to tour the dairy farms, engage in interactive exhibits and watch video livestreams of the operation plant. Visitors will also be able to enjoy Howling Cow ice cream while touring the center. All sales made will go toward maintaining the farm’s operations. The center will begin development in early 2018.
  • “The egg battle over states’ rights and farming regulations,” Southern Farm Network: The national discussion on how U.S. agriculture should act and look will continue to evolve as it always has. The debate started almost a decade ago and now appears headed to the highest court in the land. Though the case may seem trivial to some, it is not to others. In 2008, California voters by a relatively strong margin approved Proposition 2, which led to what now is the Prevention of Farm Animal Cruelty Act. The act in part prohibits the confinement of certain farm animals in a manner that does not allow them to turn around freely, lie down, stand or fully extend their limbs. California farmers had until Jan. 1, 2015, to comply. California policymakers broadened. …
  • “Americans set to eat record amount of meat in 2018,” Southeast Farm Press: To be precise, the average consumer will eat 222.2 pounds (100.8 kilos) of red meat and poultry this year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, surpassing a record set in 2004. Meanwhile, domestic production will surpass 100 billion pounds for the first time, as livestock owners expand their herds on the back of cheap feed grain. …
  • “Hemp, Inc. Applauds Passing of Industrial Hemp Legislation in Several States Across US,” Globe Newswire: Hemp, Inc. (OTC PINK: HEMP), a global leader in the industrial hemp industry, with the largest multi-purpose industrial hemp processing facility in the western hemisphere, now selling its main product, a loss circulation material (LCM) called Drillwall, today announced that it applauds several states across the U.S. for passing legislation to promote growth of the industrial hemp industry. Excitement about California legalizing recreational marijuana, in less than a week, has savvy investors in a frenzy as the stock market’s marijuana sector explodes. Most of the “pot stocks” have been dramatically trending up in volume of shares sold and price per share. (Hemp, Inc. is no exception in this buying frenzy. And, to add fuel to the fire, Hemp, Inc. investors will be thrilled to learn that the company just sold the first truckload of its flagship product, Drillwall.)  …
  • “N.C. sweet potatoes headed to hurricane victims,” Sampson Independent: A casual conversation between two cousins has yielded a tractor-trailer load of 40,000 pounds of North Carolina-raised sweet potatoes headed to Hurricane Harvey victims in Port Arthur, Texas. Deacon William Stanley of Charlotte’s Friendship Missionary Baptist Church was recently visiting his cousins back home in Faison, a small town in farm-rich Sampson County, part of eastern North Carolina, and also home of the 8,000 acres of Burch Farms. Stanley was telling cousin Jimmy Boone how his church had sent two groups of men on mission projects to Port Arthur to help homeowners whose lives were virtually in shambles from effects of flooding and other damages left in the wake of the late-summer disaster. …
  • “First up for NC lawmakers in 2018? Dealing with GenX pollution,” The News & Observer: The more scientists look for GenX and other similar, potentially hazardous chemicals in North Carolina, the more they find. And next spring they could ramp up their efforts. The state’s environmental regulators at the Department of Environmental Quality took several actions in late 2017 against the company that has been accused of being behind much of the water pollution. And as 2018 rolls around, the legislature appears ready to give DEQ more direction on addressing GenX. State lawmakers have squabbled over some of the details on how to address GenX, a chemical used in Teflon whose health effects are largely untested. But disagreements aside, addressing water pollution is high on the list for lawmakers when they return briefly to Raleigh in January. There’s a bipartisan consensus in the General Assembly that more action is needed. …
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