Viewing: Forest Health

2017 southern pine beetle populations low this year; few areas expecting increasing populations

By on July 12, 2017

The insect that is dubbed “the most destructive forest pest in the South” does not look nearly as ominous as it is. Smaller than a grain of rice, the southern pine beetle is small but packs a big punch. The

Music to Their Ears: Periodical cicadas are loud but pose little threat to trees

By on June 28, 2017

This year, western North Carolina got an earful.  A 17-year periodical cicada emergence is coming to an end, but is leaving ringing ears and dead branch tips in its wake. North Carolinians in the emergence areas no doubt heard the

The Nice Lice: Bark lice are nothing to worry about

By on June 14, 2017

Every parent dreads the call from their child’s school that lice has been found.  Frantic sessions of chemical dousing, hair combing, and sheet washing typically follow.  Phantom itching leave many paranoid for days or weeks to follow. Altogether, an unpleasant

Forest tent caterpillar strikes again! Outbreaks in NC continue for the third year running

By on May 17, 2017

Warm days are approaching here in North Carolina and all things spring can be seen! Beautiful flowers budding, green grass in yards, and butterflies fluttering around in the sunshine are all things you can see outside. However, if you look

Cherry On Top: Black cherry in NC

By on March 23, 2016

Approximately 270 million black cherry trees are scattered across North Carolina’s forests and they just recently began displaying their show-stopping flowers. Black cherry is the largest native cherry and an economically valuable species, second only to black walnut in the

Sweating the small stuff: NC Plant Conservation Program to protect small endangered plant

By on February 24, 2016

Pondberry, a small, wetland shrub with yellow flowers that pop up each spring, may soon be gone forever in the state. The shrub, native to the Southeast and historically found in wetland habitats, was essentially wiped out last century as

Emerald ash borer turns over a new leaf, attacks novel host plant

By on February 11, 2015

As its name suggests, the invasive emerald ash borer feeds on ash trees, killing them. All species of ash native to the U.S. are susceptible to the beetle, which puts at risk the four species that can be found in

2014: Forest Health Year-In-Review

By on December 31, 2014

The beauty and productivity of North Carolina’s forests have historically been challenged by a variety of threats.  Healthy forests are generally accustomed to pests and conditions that are native to the area where they grow. Outbreaks of common pests may occur

Naturally spooky: Spanish moss

By on October 8, 2014

Spanish moss is an icon of beauty in the Southeast. However, this drooping, hair-like plant might make some people’s hair stand on end! It summons a somewhat creepy vibe, one that can be especially appreciated with Halloween lurking around the

April tornadoes bring damage to N.C. forests

By on May 7, 2014

In the past several weeks, severe storms plagued North Carolina, leaving paths of destruction behind. Tornadoes, high winds, hail and flooding can all cause major damages to forest trees, urban and shade trees, and structures. Last week, the N.C. Forest